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CLICK(1) Click Packages CLICK(1)

NAME

click - package management tool for Ubuntu Touch

SYNOPSIS

click command [options] [arguments]

DESCRIPTION

Click is a packaging format for Ubuntu Touch applications, independent of the packaging format used to deliver the underlying system. The click program is the basic tool used to build, install, remove, and otherwise manipulate these packages.

click’s various functions are available via a number of commands, described in detail below.

While click supports per-user installation, packages are normally unpacked as a special clickpkg user, to ensure that applications cannot modify their own code; it is a design goal to ensure that click can be used to install untrusted code which is then confined using AppArmor. As such, click should normally be run as root (e.g. using sudo) when installing packages; it will drop privileges as needed.

COMMAND OVERVIEW

click build DIRECTORY
click buildsource DIRECTORY
click chroot
click contents PATH
click framework list
click hook install HOOK
click hook remove HOOK
click hook run-system
click hook run-user
click info PATH
click install PACKAGE-FILE
click list
click pkgdir {PACKAGE-NAME|PATH}
click register PACKAGE-NAME VERSION
click unregister PACKAGE-NAME [VERSION]
click verify PACKAGE-FILE


COMMANDS

click build DIRECTORY

Build a Click package from the contents of DIRECTORY. The build directory must contain a JSON-formatted manifest, described further in Click’s file-format documentation; by default, this is expected to be in manifest.json at the top level of the build directory.

The resulting .click file is written to the current directory, so to avoid confusion you should generally ensure that your working directory is not inside the build directory when running this command.

While it is possible to build a new version of a Click package by unpacking and repacking an existing package, this is not normally recommended because it requires some care to put the manifest file back in the right place. It is best to keep your application’s code in separate revision control rather than relying on recovering it from packages.

Options:

Read package manifest from PATH (default: manifest.json).
Ignore the given shell-pattern when building the package. The option may be repeated multiple times to list multiple patterns to exclude.
Don’t run checks from click-reviewers-tools on the resulting .click file.

click buildsource DIRECTORY

Build a source package in .tar.gz format from the contents of DIRECTORY. This allows you to distribute source code in the case where your package contains compiled code (and so the Click package does not constitute its own source).

The resulting .tar.gz file is written to the current directory, so to avoid confusion you should generally ensure that your working directory is not inside the build directory when running this command.

Options:

Read package manifest from PATH (default: manifest.json).
Ignore the given shell-pattern when building the package. The option may be repeated multiple times to list multiple patterns to exclude.

click chroot

Manage chroot environments for cross-building Click packages.

Options:

Set the target architecture.
Set the target framework (default: ubuntu-sdk-13.10).
Set the target series for newly-created chroots (default: a series appropriate for the framework). This option is mainly for debugging; use -f instead.

Subcommands:

Begin a persistent chroot session.
Create a chroot.
Destroy a chroot.
End a persistent chroot session.
Install packages in the chroot.
Run a maintenance command in the chroot. Unlike run, this runs its command as root inside the chroot, and its effects on the chroot will persist after click chroot maint exits.

If a session name is given, run the command in that session. The session must previously have been created by click chroot begin-session.

Run a program in the chroot.

If a session name is given, run the command in that session. The session must previously have been created by click chroot begin-session.

Upgrade the chroot.

click contents PATH

Display the contents of the Click package in PATH as a file listing.

click framework list

Display a list of available frameworks as one framework per line.

click hook install HOOK

Install files associated with HOOK for any Click packages that attach to it.

This is normally only called by maintainer scripts of system packages, by way of dh_click(1).

Options:

Look for additional packages in PATH.

click hook remove HOOK

Remove files associated with HOOK for any Click packages that attach to it.

This is normally only called by maintainer scripts of system packages, by way of dh_click(1).

Options:

Look for additional packages in PATH.

click hook run-system

Run all system-level hooks for all installed Click packages. This is useful when starting up from images with preinstalled packages which may not have had their system-level hooks run properly when building the image.

Options:

Look for additional packages in PATH.

click hook run-user

Run all user-level hooks for all Click packages registered for a given user. This is useful at session startup to catch up with packages that may have been preinstalled and registered for all users.

Options:

Look for additional packages in PATH.
Run user-level hooks for USER (default: current user).

click info {PACKAGE-NAME|PACKAGE-FILE}

When given a package name (that is, a string containing no / characters), display the manifest for that package, if it is registered for the current user.

When given a path (that is, a string containing at least one / character, or a string containing no / characters that is not a registered package name), attempt to treat that as a path to a file containing a Click package and display the manifest for that package.

Options:

Look for additional packages in PATH.
List packages registered by USER (if you have permission).

click install PACKAGE-FILE

Install the Click package in PACKAGE-FILE.

This is a low-level tool; to install a package as an ordinary user you should generally use pkcon install-local PACKAGE-FILE or some higher-level user interface instead, which take care to use the correct set of options. (Do not use sudo when invoking pkcon, as it needs to know the calling user.)

click install may be used to preinstall a package in an image such that it will be available to all users by default. When doing this, you should normally install it to one of the databases defined in /etc/click/databases/ other than the default of /var/lib/clickpkg. For example:

sudo click install –root=/custom/click –all-users foo.click


The --force-missing-framework option is necessary while working with development versions of SDKs which have not yet put a framework declaration in place.

You should always register installed packages either for a specific user or for all users; if you do not do this then the packages may be garbage-collected later. You can do this using the --user or --all-users options to this command, or using the click register command.

Options:

Install packages underneath PATH.
Install despite missing system framework.
Register package for USER.
--all-users
Register package for all users.

click list

Display a list of installed packages, either as one package per line with each line containing a package name and version separated by a tab (the default), or as a JSON array of manifests.

By default, click list shows only packages registered for the current user. The --all option causes it to show all installed packages, regardless of user registrations.

Options:

Look for additional packages in PATH.
List all installed packages.
List packages registered by USER (if you have permission).
Format output as a JSON array of manifests.

click pkgdir {PACKAGE-NAME|PATH}

When given a package name (that is, a string containing no / characters), display the directory where that package is installed, if it is registered for the current user.

When given a path (that is, a string containing at least one / character), attempt to treat that as a path to a file within a Click package and print the top-level directory where that package is installed, if one exists. This is particularly useful in hooks that need to find the top-level package directory based on a symbolic link to a single file within it.

Exits zero if and only if a directory for the given package name or path was found.

Options:

Look for additional packages in PATH.
List packages registered by USER (if you have permission).

click register PACKAGE-NAME VERSION

Register an installed Click package for a user. This will normally cause user-level hooks to be run for that user, which are needed for things such as making the application’s .desktop file available to the user interface.

Options:

Look for additional packages in PATH.
Register package for USER (default: current user).
--all-users
Register package for all users.

click unregister PACKAGE-NAME [VERSION]

Unregister an installed Click package for a user, and remove it entirely if no other users still have it registered and if it does not appear to be running. This will normally cause user-level hooks to be run for that user, which are needed for things such as removing the application’s .desktop file from the user interface.

If a version is specified, then the registered version must match it in order to be removed.

Options:

Look for additional packages in PATH.
Unregister package for USER (default: $SUDO_USER, if known).
--all-users
Unregister package that was previously registered for all users.

click verify PACKAGE-FILE

Verify the Click package in PACKAGE-FILE.

The --force-missing-framework option is necessary while working with development versions of SDKs which have not yet put a framework declaration in place.

Options:

Install packages underneath PATH.
Install despite missing system framework.

AUTHOR

Colin Watson

COPYRIGHT

2021, Canonical Ltd.

2021-04-06 0.5